Cloverfield Government

Well it’s about time I woke up from hibernation to begin posting again. Not much to say for awhile there, not to mention being preoccupied with finishing the next volume of the Stahl translation, about the state and constitutional law. I hope to have it published within a month (that’s quite optimistic though). At any rate, I did have a thought to communicate! And that is this. I finally got around to watching the movie “Cloverfield.” It’s not one of those movies my wife likes to see, so it sat around gathering dust until she went out of town for a few days, at which point I blew the dust off of the said DVD and watched it. What a grotesque movie, yet very well done, because it seemed real enough to actually have happened. But, here comes the thought I wanted to communicate: the monster in Cloverfield, while highly believable, was not quite up to the times. If he really wanted to come over as a modern-day monster, he would have gotten on the national news, have blamed all the carnage in Manhattan on the army, and stated that he really was there to fix things, to restore order, to rebuild, he being the only entity large enough to be able to do that. After all, isn’t that what our government has done? Destroyed the economy through years of either parasitic or blatantly destructive action (e.g., subprime mortgage sponsorship), and then blame the entire mess on the victims, to wit, business and the market. We have a Cloverfield government; but there are those who are filming with their camcorders for posterity’s sake. This hopefully will allow future generations to learn from our mistake, not to listen to big ugly green monsters, replete with giant teeth, in politicians’ clothing.

What is a Crisis of Trust?

We hear a lot these days about the current financial crisis being one of trust. Banks don’t trust each other any more, lenders don’t trust borrowers, investors don’t trust who or what they are investing in. That is all true, but it does not get to the heart of the matter.

What is trust? It is confidence that commitments will be honored, that agreements will be kept. Which gives us an indication of the true nature of the capitalist economy.

Classical economics has many virtues, but it has also saddled capitalism with the concept of homo economicus, the egotistical, self-serving economic actor as the core of the capitalist system. This is a gross misconception. Capitalism is not built upon self-serving egotists but upon people willing to make commitments to each other, both short-term and long-term, regarding their economic resources. That is what credit and debt, borrowing and lending, are all about. The commitments are mutual. When these commitments are reneged on on the scale they have been in the current crisis, the system fails.

Therefore it is a much better characterization of capitalism to label it the “commitment economy” rather than the “greed economy,” which is what the Left paints it as, thanks to classical economics.

Capitalism is commitments, not greed. The trust one hears so much about is trust in keeping commitments. Capitalism, friends, is the commitment economy.

Anticapitalism as Default Mode

What explains the uphill battle Republicans have in convincing people that their agenda is better for the economy than that of the Democrats? What explains the ease with which Democrats can pretend that economic woes are attributable to Republicans, in the face of all evidence to the contrary?

One may blame the monolithic left-wing mainstream media for the one-sided coverage they provide on the issue, but that in fact begs the question a bit. For how is it that the media can come to be so one-sided?

The bottom line is, human beings have a basic anti-capitalist bias that is the default mode in the face of any crisis. Facts don’t matter, emotions take over, and no amount of explanation seems to penetrate. Democrats simply appeal to this emotion.

Like taking candy from a baby.